Interviews

"An anthology that takes you to the dark places of the mind." - Hindustan Times Brunch Magazine

A young girl, recovering from the recent death of her father, discovers some Dean Martin records in her dusty attic and falls in love with the singer, who’s long dead. A shopaholic woman gets trapped in a mall for a year, and tries desperately to locate the exit. A famed architect, nearing 80, considers a public suicide of his ideas; a beetle collector, overly possessive about his wife, wants to shrink his wife. These wonderfully dark and twisted stories are from environmental researcher and author Tejaswini Apte-Rahm's recent debut anthology, These Circuses That Sweep The Landscape (Aleph)... [read more

Interview in the Hindustan Times Brunch Magazine, 10 January 2017

 “Writing is a way of engaging with other writers and other books” - The Asian Age & Deccan Chronicle

I often have the strange feeling that my “self” is being dispersed and scattered through the time and space of the day. Writing brings all those scattered elements of myself together again. It is a way of taking stock of the day, of my life, of the world around. And it is a way of engaging with other writers and other books...[read more]

Interview  in The Asian Age & Deccan Chronicle, 14 May 2017

"I wanted to write a story about a girl whose love ignores the limitations of time" -  Ilovedeanmartin Blog

It’s a ‘What If’ story that explores the difference between fan love and real love – and asks the question: ‘Who’s to say what the difference is?’ I leave it upto the reader to reach his or her own conclusion on what kind of love it is – I don’t push for a particular interpretation. But as the writer, the only way for me to write this story, was to believe my character when she says it is true love, and to listen to her voice describing her experience of living with this impossible love. [read more]

Interview  on Ilovedeanmartin blog, 27 February 2017

"Short stories mirror the fragmentary experience of life" - Writers Melon

I admire the short story form because of its precision and sparse use of words; the way it creates an entire world within a few pages. I love the genre because it has the potential to provide a differently textured understanding of life, as compared to the novel. Life is not experienced like a novel which follows the conventional beginning, middle and end structure (though you can impose that kind of narrative on it with hindsight). Rather, I feel that we experience life as a series of fragments, often without neat endings – more often than not, episodes in our lives remain open-ended, loose ends don’t get tied up, closure to an episode may come only years later. Short stories are uniquely placed to mirror that fragmentary experience of life. [read more]

Interview on Writers Melon website, 20 February 2017

“I realized that the stories were rather dark and twisty, often with a dangerous edge to them. I think that is what binds the collection together.” -  Michelle Wendy D’Costa blog

I realized that the stories were rather dark and twisty, often with a dangerous edge to them. I think that is what binds the collection together. As a writer I would not worry about not having a theme to a collection of stories – the main thing is to write honestly and from deep within, even if that means facing uncomfortable truths about yourself. In the end it is the writer’s unique sensibility that will bind a collection together...[read more]

Interview on Michelle Wendy D'Costa's website, 2 May 2017

"Year after year, we look forward to new voices in literature who guide us to places we never would have ventured to" -

Platform Magazine

Year after year, we look forward to new voices in literature who guide us to places we never would have ventured to. This time, we take a look at Tejaswini’s These Circuses That Sweep Through The Landscape, a collection of stories about lives that are never ordinary—because the people living them are never quite what they seem...[read more]

 

Interview in Platform Magazine, May/June 2016